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Potential job seekers can register to obtain free entry to the Career Fair and Exhibit Hall


WASHINGTON — September’s Radio Show will feature a Career Fair, Sept. 27 from 12–3 p.m., hosted by the National Association of Broadcasters Educational Foundation and the Broadcast Education Foundation.

A release said, “The Career Fair will provide experienced professionals and entry-level job seekers the opportunity to network with major radio companies. Employment opportunities include radio sales, technology, management and on-air positions, among others.”

Potential job seekers can register here using code CF18 to obtain free entry to the Career Fair and Radio Show Exhibit Hall.

Companies interested in participating can secure a booth for $200 by completing an online recruiter registration form . All recruiters receive Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) credit for their participation.

Radio Show, produced by the NAB and RAB, will be held Sept. 25–28 at the Hilton Bonnet Creek and the Waldorf-Astoria Orlando.

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The Preventing Illegal Radio Abuse Through Enforcement Act provides additional tools to the FCC to address illegal radio operations

WASHINGTON — The PIRATE Act is one step closer to becoming law.

On June 13, the House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Communications and Technology unanimously voted to pass the PIRATE Act, otherwise known as the Preventing Illegal Radio Abuse Through Enforcement Act, which provides additional tools to the Federal Communications Commission to address illegal pirate radio operations.

FCC Commissioner Michael O’Rielly applauded the move, which sends a “clear message that pirate radio ‘stations’ must be eliminated,” he said. “This bill rightfully increases the penalties, requires regular enforcement sweeps, and augments the tools available to the commission to stop illegal pirate broadcasters.

“Today’s mark-up is an important step forward in ensuring the PIRATE Act becomes law and I look forward to seeing the bill take the next step in the legislative process,” O’Rielly continued. 

The decision was also supported by the National Association of Broadcasters, who saluted co-authors Rep. Leonard Lance (R-N.J.) and Rep. Mike Tonko (D-N.Y.) for their bipartisan sponsorship of the legislation.

“The bipartisan legislation will increase the ability of the FCC to crack down on pirate activity by increasing fines, streamlining enforcement and placing liability those who facilitate illegal radio broadcasts,” said NAB Executive Vice President of Communications Dennis Wharton.

The bill now heads to the Energy and Commerce committee for consideration.

As reported in Radio World, the PIRATE Act proposes to hike the fine for violations to as much as $100,000 per day, with a maximum fine of $2 million. The rules currently allow the FCC to impose a maximum daily penalty of about $19,200 per day.

The bill has been endorsed by several groups including the New Jersey Broadcasters Association and New York State Broadcasters Association, with association President David Donovan telling lawmakers at a subcommittee hearing earlier this year that illegal operators are undermining the nation’s Emergency Alert System, causing invasive and insidious interference, posing potential public health problems due to overexposure to radio frequency radiation, and interfering with airport communications.

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Award highlights community service efforts from non-broadcast businesses

WASHINGTON — The NAB Education Foundation announced its 2018 Corporate Leadership Award will go to telecom, networking and technology company Cisco.

“Cisco creates value and opportunity for people around the world through its innovative technology solutions and numerous education and social responsibility programs,” NABEF President Marcellus Alexander said in the announcement.

According to NABEF, the award recognizes “a non-broadcast business that exemplifies an extraordinary focus on community service and corporate social responsibility.” The company will be honored June 12 at the Celebration of Service to America Awards at the Andrew W. Mellon Auditorium in Washington.

An example of the company’s service efforts include an IT skills and career building program, the Cisco Networking Academy, which helps to educate students with entry-level career skills. According to the company, the program reached 135,247 students in the US last year — nearly 1.5 million to date. In 180 countries, the academy helps educate more than 1.3 million students annually, totaling about 8 million thus far.

Another case in point: following Hurricane Maria in 2017, Cisco’s “Tactical Operations team” partnered with nonprofit organization NetHope helped to reconnect 250,000 Puerto Ricans, aid organizations and government entities to the internet.

In a press release about the award, Cisco Senior Vice President of Corporate Affairs Tae Yoo said, “We think that by combining technology with innovative, entrepreneurial, and passionate people, we can accelerate solutions that will create positive change for individuals, business, society and our planet.”

Additionally, the company: “partnered with MIND Research Institute to support the conversion of instructional math software to an online format;” “joined Generation Yes to help prepare K-12 teachers and IT staff as they integrate technology to improve learning;” and “provided equipment and financial support to Digital Divide Data, which helps young people in developing countries build sustainable careers through technology training, scholarships and well-paying jobs.”

The Celebration of Service to America Awards are sponsored and produced by NABEF with support from the NAB, Bonneville International and Hearst Television.

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The pubcaster says sharing should mean exclusive spectrum for incumbents, wireless broadband

WASHINGTON — Public radio is waving a caution flag as the Trump Administration pushes to open up the C-band (3.7-4.2 GHz.) for broadband, echoing comments by the National Association of Broadcasters.

Its advice is to divide if it wants to conquer in the race to 5G. National Public Radio has told the FCC it should reserve some C-band spectrum for wireless broadband, but should reserve the remainder for exclusive use by incumbents, like NPR’s fixed satellite delivery of its programming.

The FCC sought comment on how to free up C-band satellite spectrum for sharing with broadband services as it seeks to advance 5G and nationwide broadband deployment, including how best to share it. NPR had plenty to say.

NPR says that the best thing to do is give incumbents and new users their own designated spectrum rather than mandate sharing of the same spectrum by both commercial wireless and fixed satellite users like NPR. Those fixed satellite users also include TV broadcast networks and cable operators. “[T]he only feasible way to share the C-band spectrum without causing harmful interference to current users is to subdivide it, and in so doing to ensure adequate protections for existing uses through guard bands and appropriate licensing requirements,” NPR said.

NPR dropped some familiar programming names whose distribution depends on C-band spectrum to get to 42 million people via 1,270 public radio stations, including Morning Edition, All Things Considered, and Marketplace.

Some wireless companies, including T-Mobile, have said that shielding and filtering can allow both to share the same spectrum, but NPR says no. “Shielding can be effective in limited circumstances to remediate interference between two fixed devices,” said the public broadcaster, “but there is currently no shielding technology that could provide the kind of dynamic, all-encompassing protection that would be required to protect against interference from mobile devices.

Similarly, filtering can be useful to block out interfering signals within a certain range, but it reduces the effectiveness of the downlink signals it protects, and it does not create the kind of clear, interference-free transmission zone that is essential to public radio’s programming distribution needs.Mobile broadband should be allowed in the band only if it does not create such interference of threaten access to all that content–including emergency alerts and local journalism–on the stations, the filing concluded.

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He is a longtime Democratic official and former Obama administration appointee



Geoffrey Starks

WASHINGTON — As expected, the White House has named FCC Enforcement Bureau official Geoffrey Starks to succeed Mignon Clyburn as Democratic FCC Commissioner.

The White House has signaled its intention to nominate Starks to the seat currently held by Democrat Mignon Clyburn, FCC chairman Ajit Pai has confirmed.

This White House has hardly treated convention with kid gloves, but traditionally, at least since President Bill Clinton, the Democratic pick for the FCC comes from the Senate minority leader, which was the case here, with Starks the pick of Sen. Chuck Schumer.

Starks is currently in the FCC’s Enforcement Bureau, which is not a typical launching pad for a commission seat, like, say, a Hill communications counsel would be, though the most recent Republican addition, Brendan Carr, came directly from the FCC as well.

“I congratulate Geoffrey Starks on his forthcoming nomination to serve as a Commissioner on the Federal Communications Commission,” said Pai in a statement. “He has a distinguished record of public service, including in the FCC’s Enforcement Bureau, and I wish him all the best during the confirmation process.”

That will be a hearing before the Senate Commerce Committee, then a vote in the full Senate.

“NAB strongly supports President Trump’s selection of Geoffrey Starks to a seat on the Federal Communications Commission,” said National Association of Broadcasters President Gordon Smith. We endorse his swift confirmation.”

Starks has an impressive Democratic résumé.

He is currently assistant bureau chief at the FCC and is focused on “closing the digital divide by bringing more broadband to underserved communities; building transformational 5G infrastructure to help deliver the largest wireless platform for innovation in the world; and advancing broadband telemedicine programs to improve access to quality medical services and health outcomes.”

Starks has an undergraduate degree from Harvard and a law degree from Yale. He also founded a community bank.

Like FCC Chairman Ajit Pai, he grew up in Kansas, though in the city rather than a small town.

His wife is Lauren Thompson Starks, a former Obama appointee. Starks is also a former staffer to then Sen. Barack Obama and a former attorney with Williams & Connolly in Washington.

His Obama-era government service includes serving under Attorney General Eric Holder at Justice, including as the lead on financial and healthcare fraud.

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Current process is “nasty, brutish and long,” FCC Chair Ajit Pai says

WASHINGTON — A new rulemaking proposed by the Federal Communications Commission would help to streamline and modify FM translator interference complaint and remediation procedures.

At its Open Meeting on May 10, the commission released a proposal that would provide greater certainty to full-power stations regarding complaint requirements, limit contentious factual disputes, and ensure prompt and consistent relief from actual translator interference, the FCC said in a release .

“Today the chair brings forth an appropriate solution with more effective process for handling legitimate complaints,” said Commissioner Michael O’Rielly, referencing the fact that the of licensed FM translators has increased from 1,850 in 1990 to more than 7,500 in 2017 — with more to come. “[I] hope to hear from stakeholders on whether or not this will adequately address the rise in interference concerns due to the successful [AM Revitalization] proceeding.”

Added Chairman Ajit Pai: “The current process for resolving such interference complaints can be nasty, brutish and long. That’s why we aim to streamline and expedite it,” he said. “These measures would provide more certainty to translator stations and full-service FM stations alike. And in many cases, they would eliminate the need for further remediation measures, resolving interference complaints more quickly.

The notice proposes that translators be given greater flexibility to move to another available frequency in the case of interference and that the rules be clarified and standardized when it comes to complaint requirements. The notice also suggests that proposed technical criteria should be used to assess actual and predicted interference, and that an outer distance limit should be created beyond which interference complaints would not be actionable.

In response to the notice, the National Association of Broadcasters said it is grateful the FCC is considering new policies. 

“[These] will extend local radio service through the use of translators while protecting the existing service of FM broadcasters,” said NAB Executive Vice President of Communications Dennis Wharton.Comments can be left at the FCC ECFS database using Media Bureau docket number 18-119.

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The acronym stands for “Preventing Illegal Radio Abuse Through Enforcement Act”


WASHINGTON — Another legislative step has been taken in the effort to fight illegal pirate radio operations.

On May 8, Rep. Leonard Lance (R-NJ) and Rep. Paul Tonko (D-NY) formally introduced a bill to Congress designed to thwart and penalize illegal radio operations.

Known as the ‘‘Preventing Illegal Radio Abuse Through Enforcement Act,” the PIRATE Act will increase the ability of the Federal Communications Commission to crack down on pirate activity by increasing fines, streamlining enforcement and placing liability those who facilitate illegal radio broadcasts.

“It is time to take these pirates off the air by hiking the penalties and working with the Federal Communications Commission on enforcement,” Lance said in a statement. Chairman Pai and Commissioner O’Rielly have been able partners in making sure these broadcasts are stopped. This bill will give the FCC even more tools to take down these illegal broadcasts.”

[Read about Chairman Pai’s plans for more anti-piracy efforts.]

As a commissioner who has long been searching for more Congressional authority to address pirate radio operations, FCC Commissioner Michael O’Rielly commended the effort after the news was announced.

“This bill rightfully increases the penalties, requires regular enforcement sweeps, and augments the tools available to the commission, which are woefully inadequate and outdated, to deal with illegal pirate broadcasters,” O’Rielly said in a statement.

O’Rielly noted that the bill notably excludes legitimate Part 15 operations — those radio hobbyists who have authority to operate without a license as long as their ERP levels remain below a specific threshold.

“While I defer to the legislative process, I think the PIRATE Act has a great chance of becoming law and helping stomp-out this illegal activity,” O’Rielly said.

The bill has been endorsed by several groups including the New Jersey Broadcasters Association, which said it has been calling for an initiative such as this for several years. “Congressman Lance has championed this legislation in an effort to protect communities from the harmful and potentially life-threatening consequences of the many illegal pirates operating in or near New Jersey,” said Paul S. Rotella, NJBA president and CEO. “This is a significant national enhancement of penalty and enforcement for those who would violate our airwaves and should give such offenders pause,” he said.

In a release expressing its support for the bill, Rotella said that members of the public may not understand the real danger that pirate radio operators pose. He pointed to potential interference to the Emergency Alert System as well as the creation of excessive RF radiation to residents and businesses in buildings with pirate radio station operations.

New Jersey is one state with a statute against pirate operations; in the Garden State, it is a forth degree felony to operate a pirate radio station, with penalties of up to $10,000 in potential liabilities and a maximum of 18 months in prison, the NJBA said. The PIRATE Act will offer a “meaningful nationwide remedy” against pirate radio operators, the organization said, since many states do not have such pirate radio laws in place.

The amendment to the Communications Act of 1934 gives “real teeth to stop these violators and keep them out of business,” Rotella said.

As reported in Radio World, the PIRATE Act proposes to hike the fine for violations to as much as $100,000 per day, with a maximum fine of $2 million. The rules currently allow the FCC to impose a maximum daily penalty of about $19,200 per day. At a Congressional hearing on the bill in March, New York State Broadcasters Association President David Donovan told lawmakers that illegal operators are undermining the nation’s Emergency Alert System, causing invasive and insidious interference, pose potential public health problems due to overexposure to radio frequency radiation, and interfere with airport communications.

“[O]ur communities are better served when broadcasting is governed by the rule of law,” Tonko said. “[This is] important legislation that will ensure our airwaves are protected from piracy and Americans on the job or on their way to work can tune their radios in peace.”

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NABEF Names Six Board Members

Emily Barr, Kim Guthrie, Rebecca Hanson, Rosemary Mercedes, Kevin Perry and Craig Robinson join the organization’s board of directors

The National Association of Broadcasters’ Education Foundation has elected six new members to its board of directors. Learn about them here.


Kim Guthrie serves as president of Cox Media Group. She oversees content, sales and operations for 14 broadcast television stations, more than 60 radio stations, seven newspapers, 11 non-daily publications and more than 100 digital sites and services.

View the 6 images of this gallery on the original article

[Read about other personnel changes at NABEF.]

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Here’s some of what you may have missed at the LVCC

LAS VEGAS — If you didn’t make it to this year’s NAB Show, here’s your chance to get a flavor of the show floor.

Contributor and broadcast engineer Chris Wygal strolled through exhibit halls, camera in hand, and this is some of what he saw.

View the 26 images of this gallery on the original article

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“Connected” means more than just transmission and reception of data, according to NAB Show session

LAS VEGAS — The word “connected” in the topic of connected cars represents more than just transmission and reception of data. That was the focus of the Sunday NAB Show Digital Futures Exchange session “New Business in Connected Car.” Attendees learned that those data connections provide much more than just information — they provide an opportunity to reach the audience behind the windshield with personally relevant information.

Audi Development Engineer Christian Winter (shown at right) spoke about the company’s hybrid radio that is featured in European versions of the Audi A8 and A6. Winter showed the system capabilities. The system is based on the RadioDNS architecture; Winter is a member of the RadioDNS steering board.

He says that the hybrid radio system for North American versions provides capability for AM and FM HD radio reception. “We love radio. It is still the number one button and the first tile on the shortcut [menu] screen.”

A demonstration of the system is located at the RadioDNS booth (N6021).

General Motors Director of Global Data Monetization Saejin Park was responsible for the rollout of 4G LTE data capability in GM vehicles. In her presentation, Park said GM has around 13 million vehicles with the OnStar system on the road today, and 8.5 million of those vehicles are 4G LTE-capable. That scale provides an opportunity to broadcasters. “You can get information on what the consumer inside is listening to, along with GPS data. When you have that kind of data, that kind of information, you can understand their listening habits.” Because of this capability, she said, “The automobile and radio industries have a chance to become more interesting and meaningful” in the coming years.

Avis Budget, one of the biggest automobile consumers, has embraced the connected car as a way to better connect with its customers. Panelist Jeff Kaelin, global vice president for product and customer experience for the Avis Budget Group, described his idea of a connected car: “a vehicle that we are able to interact with leveraging telematics equipment, and that allows us to gather information from the vehicle and communicate with the vehicle.”

Kaelin said that connectivity filters down to the entertainment options so Avis can provide “a personalized and customized experience for our consumers.”

The company has a fleet of more than 60,000 connected cars around the world; it expects to have more than 100,000 such cars by the end of summer 2018 and has committed to a global 100-percent connected car fleet by the end of 2020.

© NAB

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